Material Handling is a necessary part of most manufacturing processes. It involves lifting, moving, and dumping products, ingredients or different components. Although a lot of material handling equipment is still powered by humans, such as carts and dollies, there is also a component that relies heavily on hydraulic-powered equipment. Hydraulics can improve safety, function and power in material handling equipment. In fact, hydraulics make much of the material handling machinery you currently know possible. Even the smallest production or distribution facilities use hydraulic power.

Pallet Jacks

Pallet jacks are the perfect example. Shipments are strapped to pallets when they are too large for humans to lift and carry independently. The simplest pallet jack is able to lift and move the wooden skids around using a hydraulic bottle jack. Although it is often considered a human-powered cart, it can lift anywhere up to 5,000lbs or more due to the incredible power of the hydraulic system.

That isn’t the only part powered by hydraulics, however. The pallet jack employs a single-acting bottle jack mounted atop the pivoting steering wheels. A lever remotely operates the two-position valve within the handle, and when flipped forward allows pumping action to occur. The simple up and down reciprocating action of the handle sends fluid into the ram, lifting the pallet a few inches off the ground to facilitate easy transport. Many variations of the pallet jack provide a full selection balancing price with productivity. Some units employ electrically driven hydraulic pumps for easy and rapid lift, while others gain electric wheel drive to aid operators with heavy loads.

Fork Truck

Oftentimes, a manufacturing or distribution center will have a storage system that towers over where a simple pallet jack could reach. When this is the case, it is inevitable that a fork truck is part of the equation. A small fork truck, called a stacker, is able to do higher lifting because they use hydraulic levers or electronic joysticks, and their short profile allows the stacker to fit into tight spaces. Stackers do tend to have more limitations in both height and weight capacity, when compared to the forklift, however.

Fork Lift

Forklifts are where you see hydraulics begin to proliferate. Where a pallet jack has a single bottle jack, your forklift never runs with less than three hydraulic functions. What many people don’t realize is that a forklift that only allows for up and down motion would be a tremendous challenge. In order to make stacking pallets a little easier in the hard-to-see, hard-to-reach places, a forklift must also have a side-shift cylinder to move the lift laterally.

Bin Tipper

Bin tippers also use hydraulic cylinders to lift, tilt and dump the contents of bins using a fork truck. This means the hydraulics must be able to move the mast angle forward or backward to place pallets and remove them, as well as maintaining the center of gravity.

Hydrostatic Transmission

For those more fortunate, we can add another dimension to the forklift with a hydrostatic transmission. This provides both forward and reverse operation by tilting the control mechanism in one direction or the other. A pump powers the wheel motor in either direction in a smooth, controlled fashion. This is especially helpful when it comes to high capacity forklifts.

There are many more places you might find hydraulic power within your facility. When you take a moment to look around, I am sure you can place several. Hydraulic fluid power is the perfect partner in a material handling environment. Whether you are handling pallets or working with a custom manufactured product, every manufacturing, distribution and industrial environment can benefit from hydraulics. 

Keeping your equipment in working order is imperative for success in your industry. Yarbrough Industries so our expert technicians can get you up and going in no time.

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Many businesses use hydraulic systems in their day-to-day operations. Reducing downtime is critical, so repairing and replacing hydraulic hoses and fittings needs to be as efficient as possible. This can be challenging, especially when a hydraulic system has unusual metrics or non-standard hoses and fittings. A great resource for businesses is a hydraulic hose fitting technician service with mobile and custom solutions.

Common Hydraulic Hose and Fitting Problems:

Pressure and temperature variations make hydraulic systems susceptible to damage and failure. The SAE‘s commons reasons for this include things such as:

  • flexing the hose to less than the specified minimum bend radius
  • twisting, pulling, kinking, crushing, or abrading the hose
  • operating the hydraulic system above maximum or below minimum temperature
  • exposing the hose to rapid transient rises (surges) in pressure above the maximum operating pressure

It also stated that “intermixing hose, fittings, or assembly equipment not recommended as compatible by the manufacturer or not following the manufacturer’s instructions for fabricating hose assemblies” could cause damage or failure.

Whether your hose is damaged from wear, an accident, or misapplication, it’s a guarantee that your hydraulic hoses and fittings will need repair and replacement periodically. Obviously, repairs can turn into costly downtime for you if they aren’t done in the most efficient manner possible.

What to Look for in a Hydraulic Hose Fitting Technician Service

Whether you run a small or large operation, if you use hydraulic systems, you will need a hydraulic hose fitting technician service. Preventative maintenance and industry standards for application will let you prolong the life of hydraulic hoses and fittings. Eventually, however, you’ll need or want the help of an expert technician to fix hydraulic hoses, fittings, and quick couplers. When you encounter this, it’s important to have a technician that fits your needs in mind to be sure daily operations continue with as little downtime as possible.

Peak efficiency enhances productivity and makes things run smoothly. A quality hydraulic hose fitting technician service can help you accomplish these goals and maintain operational continuity when related problems occur.

Why Mobile Services?

When you are looking for a hydraulic hose fitting service, you can gauge effectiveness in large part by their mobile service capabilities. The more they can accomplish on-site the better, especially for businesses trying to reduce downtime due to hydraulic system repair.

Although many services offer 24/7 emergency repair, they often fail to repair or replace damaged hydraulic hoses and fittings on-site on the first visit. This may be because the mobile units don’t have expanded storage capabilities or custom fabrication capabilities. Whatever the reason, the result is costly downtime for businesses.

The key is finding a hydraulic hose fitting technician service that has expanded mobile storage and custom fabrication capabilities. Here at Yarbrough Industries, we offer both for residents of Springfield, MO and the surrounding region.

Wherever you are located, carefully consider who you hire as your hydraulic hose fitting technician service. If the service has mobile capabilities like Yarbrough Industries, you’ll benefit from expanded service capabilities and reduce costly hydraulic system downtime.

Fixing Hydraulic Hoses and Fittings Efficiently

You have to fix hydraulic hoses and fittings quickly and effectively in order to maintain continuity with business operations. Industries using hydraulic systems have different needs and expectations with their equipment. However, everyone shares a common objective of being productive and when hoses and fittings are fixed or replaced quickly and effectively, you will meet this objective.

A primary hindrance you’ll face is solving the complexities involved with repairing hoses and fittings. There are over 16 different hose types, three layers of construction (tube, reinforcement, cover), a multitude of fittings, and multiple manufacturers to choose from. Adding in SAE standards that aren’t enforced, unusual metrics, non-standard hoses and fittings, and various industry settings, it’s easy to get overwhelmed.

Solving these complexities is what businesses want their hydraulic hose fitting technician service to accomplish. It’s even better when it is a quick and effective service on the first visit using expanded mobile capabilities. For local businesses located in the southwest Missouri area, this means contacting Yarbrough Industries to repair, upgrade, and maintain all your hydraulic hose fitting needs

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When your hydraulic system stops working, no matter the cause, it can bring productivity to a grinding halt (both literally and figuratively). Troubleshooting and tracking down the problem will take skill, experience and common sense. There are a few basics that anyone can handle, however. The basics of hydraulic troubleshooting serve as a reminder to keep it simple and take time to do each step. This will save money and time in the long run.  

Preparing for Troubleshooting

Before you even begin the troubleshooting process, it’s important to know what the problem is. This means you have to ask questions before you start. Some basic questions might be:

  • How long has this been happening/When did it start?
  • When did you first notice the problem and what was happening? (startup/shut down/heavy load/temperature change/etc.)
  • Have there been any recent changes to the system, such as maintenance, modifications to the settings, or repairs?
  • When was maintenance last performed?

Once you have as much information as you can gather, pull the hydraulic schematics for reference. It’s important to know that you should not attempt troubleshooting without this! The schematics provide valuable information about flow and pressure in the system.

Common Problems

There are a number of issues that commonly prevent hydraulic systems from working properly, such as an inoperative system or overheating hydraulic fluid. In any basic troubleshooting, it’s key to look at the most typical issues that arise in hydraulic systems first.

System Inoperative

When your hydraulic system is inoperative, there are several things that can be checked. First, you must verify the hydraulic fluid levels and check for leaks, as they can lead to significant loss of hydraulic fluid. Filters are also a common problem because if they are dirty or clogged, they can seriously impact performance. Check your hydraulic lines for restrictions such as collapse or clogging. Be sure you do not have any air leaks affecting the suction line. Also, inspect the pump itself; if it is worn, dirty, or out of alignment, it will affect system performance. The drive can be a source of issues if belts or couplings are slipping or broken. 

Slow Operation

If your hydraulic system is working more slowly than normal, it could be as simple as the hydraulic fluid is too thick, which may be due to cold temperatures or the use of an inappropriate hydraulic fluid. Air trapped in the system can be a problem, as well as restrictions in the line, due to dirty hydraulic filters. Another potential issue is badly worn hydraulic components such as pumps, motors, cylinders, and valves.

Erratic Operation

When a system is operating in an erratic, unpredictable manner, it can be very frustrating. One of the most common causes for this is air trapped in the system or hydraulic fluid that is too cold. Damaged internal components, such as bearings and gears can also be a reason, although it is a bit less common.

Excessive Noise or Vibration

Something that almost anyone who works with hydraulic equipment has experienced is excessive/abnormal noise or vibration. The pump being noisy calls for a check that the oil level is sufficient, the correct type of fluid is being used, and that the oil is not foamy. If the oil is foamy, that informs you that there is air in the fluid. This can lead to cavitation and expensive damage. It is also wise to verify that the inlet screen and suction line are not plugged. For both pumps and hydraulic motors, there can also be internal issues, namely worn or misaligned bearings. Noise and/or vibration can also mean you need to make sure the couplings are secure and tight. Keep in mind that pipes and pipe clamps can vibrate if they are not secured properly, so take a moment to check them over if none of the other checks show an issue.

Overheating Hydraulic Fluid

Excessive heat is never a good sign in a hydraulic system and often leads to a system working at sub-optimal levels. One of the primary purposes of hydraulic fluid is to dissipate generated heat, but the system should not be generating enough heat to cause the fluid to reach high temperatures.

There can be many causes behind hot hydraulic fluid, starting with contaminated hydraulic fluid or fluid levels that are too low. There may be oil passing through the relief valve for too long at a time; in this case, the control valve should be set to neutral when it is not in use. Worn-out components within the system can also lead to excessive temperatures due to internal leakage. Restrictions in the line or dirty filters can result in hot hydraulic fluid or if hydraulic fluid viscosity is too low, it can lead to overheating as well. Finally, there may be a need to make sure that the oil cooler is functioning correctly and that the key components are clean enough for the heat to radiate away from them.

No Fluid Flow

Having no flow within the hydraulic system is a serious issue that can have several different sources. The first step is to determine exactly where the fluid flow stops, such as failure of the pump to receive fluid at the inlet (usually the result of a clogged line or dirty strainers) or a failure for fluid to exit the outlet, which could be due to a pump motor that needs replacing, a sheared coupling between the pump and drive, or a pump/drive failure. It would also be a good idea to make sure the pump rotation is set correctly and the directional valves are in the correct position.

The most expensive problem would be a damaged pump that needs to be replaced or repaired. Getting your hydraulic system back in working order can be a time-consuming process. At Yarbrough Industries, we understand the importance of having a functional, efficient hydraulic system. We know that downtime is a price that you can’t pay in both money and time. That is why we offer comprehensive hydraulic services on-site troubleshooting and repair. Our team of experienced technicians can work on motors, pumps, valves, cylinders, and systems. When complex repairs are called for, we have a full machining center and certified welders. We also offer customized maintenance plans tailored to your needs and your equipment.

 

Contact us today to find out how Yarbrough Industries can help keep your hydraulic systems operating efficiently.

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When you need someone to do an on-site mobile repair, using an authorized service center is the best route. Not only will it save you time and money, but it can also give you the peace of mind that your equipment will be better performing and will run for longer. Several facets go into a great mobile repair unit, including the utilization of trained service technicians, genuine service parts, and factory warranties. Here are some factors you should look at when choosing the mobile service unit to help your company. 

1. Trained Service Technicians

When you look at a company to repair your equipment, one of the first things you should research is what type of training their technicians have had. Ideally, they will be factory trained, as well as having specific training through their business. It is also helpful if they are certified to perform quality repairs and rebuilds just like the manufacturer. 

2. Certified Parts Dealer 

By choosing a company that sells, services, and inventories genuine manufacturer’s service parts, you can determine the quality and durability of the parts that will be used when replacing or repairing your machinery are second to none. Generally, this will also mean that the technicians must follow factory-approved rework specifications as well.

3. Factory Warranty

Typically, quality and reputable repair companies will offer a warranty that is the same or similar to that of the manufacturer(s) they carry. Looking for this when you are choosing the mobile company to do your onsite service can offer huge cost savings. Look into the warranties to guarantee the best fit for your company and equipment. 

4. Short Lead Time

When you need someone on-site, it is typically because you are already short on time. When you are looking for the right company to do those repairs, they should compete with new unit lead time. Most hydraulic repair shops stock the most commonly used service parts, allowing factory-quality component repair and rebuild to be performed in as little as two weeks. 

If you are looking for a company that can meet all your specifications and get you up and running in no time, call Yarbrough Industries today.

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No matter how well you care for your hydraulic system, there is always the chance that it may form a leak. Although it usually seems minor in the beginning, even a small leak could grow over time. It’s important to know how to locate leaks and deal with them early to prevent costly repairs later on. 

How Do You Know If Your Hydraulic System Has a Leak?

There are many factors that can cause or contribute to a leak in any hydraulic system. The majority of leaks occur because of one of the following conditions:

  • Connectors and fittings are loosened by shock and vibrations
  • Wear and tear on seals in the hydraulic cylinders
  • High-temperature damage, possibly due to using incompatible fluid

Although these are not the only reasons a hydraulic system forms a leak, they are the most common.

Other system issues can lead to leaks as well. Discovering the leak often leads to finding other issues your hydraulic system may have. No matter the cause of the leak, you need to find it and fix it as soon as possible.

By paying careful attention to the signs, you can typically find a leak before it causes large problems. Here are a few ways you can tell your hydraulic system has a leak somewhere.

Visual Inspection

Regularly looking over your hydraulic system can occasionally be an essay way to find a leak. Signs of a leak might include things like puddles or wet spots around or under your system. If you can visually spot a leak, it’s important to deal with it immediately.

Drops in Fluid Levels

Another important aspect of your hydraulic system that you should monitor is the fluid levels. If you notice the fluid levels dropping, you can safely assume you have a leak. Fast drops in the levels mean you have a clear problem somewhere within your hydraulic system. Slow, gradual leaks may be more challenging to find, but if you check the levels frequently, you will notice the missing fluid.This is another fairly easy issue to diagnose and repair quickly if you stay on top of it.

Drops in Pressure

When a hydraulic system begins leaking, it cannot always maintain the right operating pressure. This could also seem like a general slowdown in the way your system is operating.

In addition to other signs, your hydraulic system may start making noises or your fluid may reach excessive temperatures. Generally, if your hydraulic system isn’t performing as it should, heavy leaks could be the culprit.

How to Deal With Hydraulic System Leaks

Once you know you have a leak, you’ll need to pinpoint the location of the leak and any other leaks you might have. Since most leaks occur at joints, seals, and connectors, you can check those areas immediately. When checking for leaks:

  • Depressurize the system. 
    Put on thick leather gloves.
  • Don’t use your hand to check for the leak or you could burn yourself.
  • Use cardboard or a piece of wood to check for the leak.

If you find a leak at a fitting, tighten the fitting. You may want to replace any faulty connections altogether with high-grade compatible ones, including seals. Also, search along the hoses to look for signs of damage or leakage. Replace any damaged hoses immediately.

To find leaks for a larger hydraulic system, use a professional service.

Various tools and methods exist for detecting leaks in larger systems, including dyes that can help pinpoint hard to find leaks.

You can find tools to test pressure, flow, and temperature yourself, which can help you detect leaks. However, you need a proper understanding of hydraulic mechanics to use these types of tools.

At Yarbrough Industries we are hydraulic repair specialists. If you are experiencing leaks or need quality hydraulic parts, contact us today for assistance.

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Hydraulic cylinders are used in many industrial applications, including various manufacturing equipment and engineering vehicles or civil engineering equipment. Hydraulic cylinders may encounter challenges for a variety of reasons. Regular equipment inspection and a good preventive maintenance plan will help decrease the chances of cylindrical failure due to the following reasons:

Seal Leakage

One of the most common reasons we see cylinder failure is due to seal leakage. This can be caused by various reasons, from something as simple as an incorrect fitting to inappropriate metalwork clearances. Some other causes of hydraulic cylinder seal leakage might be something like markings on seal grooves or corrosion.

Contaminated Fluid

Fluid contamination is another major reason for cylindrical failure. Abrasive particles that are trapped in a contaminated fluid can bring severe damage to the piston rod or seal surface. A faulty wiper seal usually induces airborne contamination.

Damaged Rod Bearings or Piston Rods

It is also common to see damaged rod bearings or piston rods that lead to hydraulic cylinder failure. This is caused due to improper alignment between the load and the cylinder, resulting in bending or sideloading.

Internally Corroded Barrel

The contaminated fluid inside a cylinder can lead to internal corrosion. This can be avoided by blocking the water ingress inside the cylinder. However, it may be a sign that the cylinder is being used in an environment where it should not be used. It’s important for an expert to determine the cause of the corrosion and how it should be remedied. 

Broken Eye Bearing

If a cylinder handles loads above its specification, you may encounter a broken eye bearing.  These may also be caused by a shock loading or a sudden impact due to high pressure.

Extreme Temperatures

This factor may affect hydraulic cylinders by limiting the choice of seal geometries or materials. It can also cause less lubrication and/or seals with cracked sides or brittle appearance.

Chemical Contact

Certain chemicals can cause cylinder failure when they come in contact with the seal. While verifying beforehand can prevent this, it is often forgotten, leading to compatibility issues and numerous problems. 

There are various other reasons for a cylindrical failure ranging from high-pressure conditions to side loading and more. However, if you notice any hydraulic cylinder failure symptoms, you can immediately contact an expert preventative maintenance service such as Yarbrough Industries. 

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There is no time to waste when your hydraulic equipment fails. You have to get it working as soon as possible. There are always three options when it comes to hydraulic equipment – repair, replace or rebuild. How do you know which one to choose?

All three options can be good, but more and more companies are opting to rebuild hydraulic equipment rather than purchasing new components or repairing the existing components. What is a rebuild, and when should you choose that option over repairing or replacing a component? It’s important to make an informed decision the next time you face a hydraulic equipment failure, so let’s look at the options.

Equipment Repair vs. A Full Rebuild

Definitions of a rebuild can vary based on the shop you visit, but typically a rebuild is a piece of equipment that has been used previously and completely reconditioned for further use. Our expert rebuilders at Yarbrough Industries can not only restore a piece of equipment to OEM specifications, they can often exceed the quality of a brand-new machine.

A proper hydraulic equipment rebuild means that it is completely disassembled and every piece is inspected individually. The parts are evaluated for wear, damage, and effect on the overall life of the component. Replacement and reconditioning of parts are performed as needed, the component is reassembled, and then it undergoes a thorough quality and performance testing.

A repair is a process focusing on fixing the individual parts involved in the failure, rather than the overall equipment.

There is also some confusion about the similarity to purchasing used hydraulic equipment. However, used equipment has not generally been refurbished or reconditioned and as an older piece of equipment, maybe closer to a failure.

Pricing Your Choice:

Rebuilds are increasing in popularity every year because they tend to cost less over time.

A rebuild typically costs about half of the price of a new piece of equipment, and this includes components like hydraulic motors and pumps.

While repairs may initially be cheaper, it’s only a matter of time before the equipment fails and repairs are once again needed.

In the long run, rebuilds usually end up being cheaper than repairs and are certainly less expensive than purchasing new replacement parts.

Consider Your Lead Time

Choosing to rebuild hydraulic equipment over purchasing new equipment is often the decision when time is of the essence. A certified rebuild usually involves a much shorter lead time, typically because there is significant time that is spent waiting for replacement parts to possibly be manufactured and then delivered. The longer the wait for replacement parts, the longer machines are down, which creates production cost issues and downtime for employees.

When these issues are factored in, rebuilds often become the most economical option. A rebuilt component, such as a cylinder or motor, can be refurbished immediately, minimizing the downtime of the equipment and staff involved.

Let The Experts Make The Decision Easy

At Yarbrough Industries, we can help you, whether it’s a replacement, repair or rebuild. We are committed to providing your equipment the quality and lifespan you need at a price that you can afford. We evaluate and work quickly so that your company is back in business in no time. We also offer rebuild and repair services for cylinders, pumps, gears, motors, valves and other hydraulic components. We work on motor brands including Eaton, Char-Lynn and numerous others.

Here at Yarbrough, our skilled technicians can troubleshoot, rebuild, repair, install, and maintain your equipment on a preventative maintenance schedule.

We offer mobile services, and our trucks are loaded with the parts and tools needed to keep your equipment running at peak performance. Give us a call today! 

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This industry moves fast, but you can move even faster if you’re up to date on trends, technical developments, and best practices. The Yarbrough Industries blog is a go-to source for valuable, timely and detailed information. Sign up to ensure that you don’t miss a single post.